A picture full of symbolism…a History and Biography tent surrounded by the Smithsonian Castle, our nation’s Capitol, with the reality of heightened security at public gatherings and a banner showing the importance of this thing called literacy to our nation’s future, to our children. Special days today and tomorrow on the Mall, sending powerful messages with a diverse audience evident throughout the Mall. Houses of faith and school and community organization busses unloading lots of kids, many with full families attending with each child. Encouraging.

A picture full of symbolism…a History and Biography tent surrounded by the Smithsonian Castle, our nation’s Capitol, with the reality of heightened security at public gatherings and a banner showing the importance of this thing called literacy to our nation’s future, to our children. Special days today and tomorrow on the Mall, sending powerful messages with a diverse audience evident throughout the Mall. Houses of faith and school and community organization busses unloading lots of kids, many with full families attending with each child. Encouraging.

Posted on Saturday, September 21st 2013

Christopher Myers notes in an opinion piece in The Horn Book:
I wondered: if the man who killed Trayvon Martin had read A Snowy Day as a kid, would it have been as easy for him to see a seventeen-year-old in a hoodie, pockets full of rainbow candies and sweet tea, as a threat? What might have been different if images of round-headed Peter and his red hood and his snow angels were already dancing in his head?
Don’t miss this piece!

Christopher Myers notes in an opinion piece in The Horn Book:

I wondered: if the man who killed Trayvon Martin had read A Snowy Day as a kid, would it have been as easy for him to see a seventeen-year-old in a hoodie, pockets full of rainbow candies and sweet tea, as a threat? What might have been different if images of round-headed Peter and his red hood and his snow angels were already dancing in his head?

Don’t miss this piece!

Posted on Tuesday, August 6th 2013

iwearastetsonnow:

Madeline (1998)

In an old house in Paris, that was covered with vines, lived 12 little girls in two straight lines. In two straight lines they broke their bread, brushed their teeth, and went to bed. They smiled at the good, and frowned at the bad, and sometimes they were very sad.  They left the house at half past nine, in two straight lines, in rain, or shine. The smallest one was Madeline. 

Posted on Friday, January 25th 2013

Reblogged from The North Remembers