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An extraordinary exhibit of Matisse opens at The Tate in Great Britain in April featuring 120 of his “cutouts” from collections around the world. I was drooling enviously and then read it will at MOMA in New York October 2014 through February 2015…dreaming now of a holiday trip to NYC.

And don’t miss this short video of Matisse wielding the scissors. Also, the Matisse picture book shown for children is such fun! HENRI’S SCISSORS by Jeannette Winter.

(Via the Book Patrol)

Posted on Friday, March 21st 2014

I had seen interesting pieces at Book Patrol and in a Washington Post Michael Dirda column discussing Book-Jackets: Their History, Forms, and Use by G. Thomas Tanselle and published by the Bibliographical Society of the University of Virginia (image from the Society’s website).  What a treasure of a book for us book-jacket lovers!
I do love book-jackets, plain and simply; I always carefully leave them on a book unless I am traveling and don’t want the cover “messed up.” It has been interesting, therefore, to observe my three-year-old grandson who upon receiving a new book with a book-jacket always removes the book jacket as his first action; he has absolutely no use for it. (This did precipitate a learning moment about how we do NOT tear them off library books…sigh.)
In use since the early to mid-1850′s according to most historians, book-jackets, dust covers, book covers serve more than the function of preserving the hard covering; they serve in modern terminology as a billboard in many respects, and they are clearly valued art. An example of this value is the original beautiful cover of The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald published in 1925 by Charles Scribner’s and  Sons. Book Patrol notes this exquisite book-jacket was designed by artist Francis Cugat, and it is considered by many “a high-spot of dust jacket art and design.”  A first edition of the book itself is said to usually sell in the $3,000 – $4000 range. “But the  book with a dust jacket in good condition – now you’re talking $125,000  and up!”
Referring back to the “billboard” concept, what one of us has not had a book report assignment to make a book-jacket? In today’s digital age there are even templates provided on child-friendly sites where those book-jackets can be designed. Mothers have become creative in how to use those child-discarded book-jackets, there are posters of book-jackets to be ordered, and frequently book jackets are re-designed to lure a new audience or simply for discussion like these in a posting by Matt Roeser. As some have noted, cover design is needed even by the e-book industry. The topic of book-jackets is popular enough to have been featured on a CBS Sunday Morning Show in the last two years.
Children’s literature is no exception in regard to the valued book-jacket.  Two books on the topic of book-jackets were published in 2006 by Alan Powers with the second one titled Children’s Book Covers: Great Book Jacket and Cover Design serving as a companion to Front Cover: Great Book Jacket and Cover Design. The children’s edition covers the last two hundred years of children’s book-jacket design. One of the most interesting of recent children’s book-jackets is that of Into the Unknown: How Great Explorers Found Their Way by Land, Sea, and Air by Stewart Ross and illustrated by Stephen Biesty.  The book-jacket is a doubled-over piece opening to exhibit a map with the various explorers’ voyages visually outlined.
Book-jackets, book covers are always one focus in the yearly “best of” lists. What are your favorites for 2012?
Finally of course there is the move from the serious to the sublime. Often called “city-book-jackets” it’s the book-jacket that serves as the “cover up” when for whatever reason you do not wish to be seen reading the book you are actually reading.  For those city subway riders needing a new cover, check out those for sale at TrendHunter. 

I had seen interesting pieces at Book Patrol and in a Washington Post Michael Dirda column discussing Book-Jackets: Their History, Forms, and Use by G. Thomas Tanselle and published by the Bibliographical Society of the University of Virginia (image from the Society’s website).  What a treasure of a book for us book-jacket lovers!

I do love book-jackets, plain and simply; I always carefully leave them on a book unless I am traveling and don’t want the cover “messed up.” It has been interesting, therefore, to observe my three-year-old grandson who upon receiving a new book with a book-jacket always removes the book jacket as his first action; he has absolutely no use for it. (This did precipitate a learning moment about how we do NOT tear them off library books…sigh.)

In use since the early to mid-1850′s according to most historians, book-jackets, dust covers, book covers serve more than the function of preserving the hard covering; they serve in modern terminology as a billboard in many respects, and they are clearly valued art. An example of this value is the original beautiful cover of The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald published in 1925 by Charles Scribner’s and  Sons. Book Patrol notes this exquisite book-jacket was designed by artist Francis Cugat, and it is considered by many “a high-spot of dust jacket art and design.”  A first edition of the book itself is said to usually sell in the $3,000 – $4000 range. “But the  book with a dust jacket in good condition – now you’re talking $125,000  and up!”

Referring back to the “billboard” concept, what one of us has not had a book report assignment to make a book-jacket? In today’s digital age there are even templates provided on child-friendly sites where those book-jackets can be designed. Mothers have become creative in how to use those child-discarded book-jackets, there are posters of book-jackets to be ordered, and frequently book jackets are re-designed to lure a new audience or simply for discussion like these in a posting by Matt Roeser. As some have noted, cover design is needed even by the e-book industry. The topic of book-jackets is popular enough to have been featured on a CBS Sunday Morning Show in the last two years.

Children’s literature is no exception in regard to the valued book-jacket.  Two books on the topic of book-jackets were published in 2006 by Alan Powers with the second one titled Children’s Book Covers: Great Book Jacket and Cover Design serving as a companion to Front Cover: Great Book Jacket and Cover Design. The children’s edition covers the last two hundred years of children’s book-jacket design. One of the most interesting of recent children’s book-jackets is that of Into the Unknown: How Great Explorers Found Their Way by Land, Sea, and Air by Stewart Ross and illustrated by Stephen Biesty.  The book-jacket is a doubled-over piece opening to exhibit a map with the various explorers’ voyages visually outlined.

Book-jackets, book covers are always one focus in the yearly “best of” lists. What are your favorites for 2012?

Finally of course there is the move from the serious to the sublime. Often called “city-book-jackets” it’s the book-jacket that serves as the “cover up” when for whatever reason you do not wish to be seen reading the book you are actually reading.  For those city subway riders needing a new cover, check out those for sale at TrendHunter.
 

Posted on Sunday, December 30th 2012

How many times have you found yourself driving by one of those plastic, poorly styled “fake rocks” covering a utility apparatus in a residential area and thought “that is the ugliest cover” I have ever seen. Sometimes I think seeing the utility “sculpture” would be far better. 
Everett Public Library will have no such eyesore, take a look at the electric transformer cover Book Patrol has shared the library now has!

How many times have you found yourself driving by one of those plastic, poorly styled “fake rocks” covering a utility apparatus in a residential area and thought “that is the ugliest cover” I have ever seen. Sometimes I think seeing the utility “sculpture” would be far better. 

Everett Public Library will have no such eyesore, take a look at the electric transformer cover Book Patrol has shared the library now has!

Posted on Tuesday, May 8th 2012

Source j.mp

Bookseller/Diagram Prize for Oddest Title of the Year
No, this bizarre title did not win in 1990 when eligible, but Book Patrol has suggested it be considered “for lifetime membership in this illustrious group.” I tend to agree. In looking around the web for information, I learned of the Weber Journal in which there is a review of this book, a far more positive one than found in Publishers Weekly. Yes, at least two reviews for this title.  Take heart aspiring authors.
Oh, 2012 Diagram Prize?  Check it out!
(image from seattlepi.com)

Bookseller/Diagram Prize for Oddest Title of the Year

No, this bizarre title did not win in 1990 when eligible, but Book Patrol has suggested it be considered “for lifetime membership in this illustrious group.” I tend to agree. In looking around the web for information, I learned of the Weber Journal in which there is a review of this book, a far more positive one than found in Publishers Weekly. Yes, at least two reviews for this title.  Take heart aspiring authors.

Oh, 2012 Diagram Prize?  Check it out!

(image from seattlepi.com)

Posted on Friday, April 6th 2012

Source j.mp