halftheskymovement:

Shana Goodwin’s education ended at age 12 when she was trafficked by her mother’s drug dealer. At 18, she took to the streets until her last arrest in 2010. 
Now 39, Shana is a sales representative for Thistle Farms, an initiative of the Nashville nonprofit Magdalene, which runs a two-year recovery program for former prostitutes that includes free long-term housing and counseling. It also provides job opportunities for the women like Shana to make and sell scented candles, lotions and lip balms.
“I cannot imagine you sticking me in a program and giving me 28 days and saying, ‘You’re healed! Shazam! Go out into the world and find a job,’ ” Shana says. “I have 167 arrests, I have never held down a job, and that would have never worked.”
Thistle Farms’ sales grew by about 40 percent this year, and this week they celebrate their first million-dollar mark in annual sales — enough to hire 15 more women this fall!
Read more via Nashville Public Radio.

halftheskymovement:

Shana Goodwin’s education ended at age 12 when she was trafficked by her mother’s drug dealer. At 18, she took to the streets until her last arrest in 2010. 
Now 39, Shana is a sales representative for Thistle Farms, an initiative of the Nashville nonprofit Magdalene, which runs a two-year recovery program for former prostitutes that includes free long-term housing and counseling. It also provides job opportunities for the women like Shana to make and sell scented candles, lotions and lip balms.
“I cannot imagine you sticking me in a program and giving me 28 days and saying, ‘You’re healed! Shazam! Go out into the world and find a job,’ ” Shana says. “I have 167 arrests, I have never held down a job, and that would have never worked.”
Thistle Farms’ sales grew by about 40 percent this year, and this week they celebrate their first million-dollar mark in annual sales — enough to hire 15 more women this fall!
Read more via Nashville Public Radio.

Posted on Sunday, August 3rd 2014

Reblogged from

While toy libraries target younger children, libraries that offer video games draw teens. A librarian at the Houston Public Library tells NPR that offering game consoles and iPads “results in a 15% to 20% increase in the circulation of books.” The games themselves also seem to help struggling readers, with some reading text in video game format “that was up to eight grades above their reading level,” says Constance Steinkuehler, an associate professor at the University of Wisconsin.
Having gaming available at libraries has other advantages as well. It gives lower-income youth the chance to play games they may not be able to afford; offers teenagers a safe place; and helps teens understand that the library is a place where they can belong.

The case for making libraries full of toys and games – Quartz (via infoneer-pulse)

Posted on Sunday, August 3rd 2014

Reblogged from teaching literacy.

Source qz.com

lauriehalseanderson:

lhashat:

Look at this hat. It is a magnificent hat. The asymmetry. The perfectly balanced gold against the black. The perched crow atop its crooked head. How could one not appreciate its beauty?

The Hat That Changed My Life.
Am now seeking the proper cloak.

lauriehalseanderson:

lhashat:

Look at this hat. It is a magnificent hat. The asymmetry. The perfectly balanced gold against the black. The perched crow atop its crooked head. How could one not appreciate its beauty?

The Hat That Changed My Life.

Am now seeking the proper cloak.

Posted on Sunday, August 3rd 2014

Reblogged from Laurie Halse Anderson

Source lhashat