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My next readThe Shadow of the Wind by Carlos Ruiz Zafon  Translated by Lucia Graves(I have been on the libvrary waiting list for this book since DecemberI just walked by a garage sale down the street & found a 1st edition copy for $1)
Barcelona, 1945—just after the war, a great world city lies in shadow, nursing its wounds, and a boy named Daniel awakes on his eleventh birthday to find that he can no longer remember his mother’s face. To console his only child, Daniel’s widowed father, an antiquarian book dealer, initiates him into the secret of the Cemetery of Forgotten Books, a library tended by Barcelona’s guild of rare-book dealers as a repository for books forgotten by the world, waiting for someone who will care about them again.


Do you know this book?

dzeijz:

My next read
The Shadow of the Wind by Carlos Ruiz Zafon
 Translated by Lucia Graves
(I have been on the libvrary waiting list for this book since December
I just walked by a garage sale down the street & found a 1st edition copy for $1)

Barcelona, 1945—just after the war, a great world city lies in shadow, nursing its wounds, and a boy named Daniel awakes on his eleventh birthday to find that he can no longer remember his mother’s face. To console his only child, Daniel’s widowed father, an antiquarian book dealer, initiates him into the secret of the Cemetery of Forgotten Books, a library tended by Barcelona’s guild of rare-book dealers as a repository for books forgotten by the world, waiting for someone who will care about them again.

Do you know this book?

Posted on Wednesday, April 23rd 2014

Reblogged from All The Soft Stars That Shine

Cynsations: Guest Post: Joseph Bruchac on "You Don't Look Indian."

You don’t look like an Indian.

Ever heard anyone say that? It’s a safe bet that you have if you’re a contemporary Native American. Or, as my friends in Canada put it, a member of a First Nation.

And those were the exact words that I heard this past Saturday. Standing in front of a group of fifty sixth and seventh graders at Henry Hudson Middle School (And no, I shall not go into a rant about its namesake right now) in the Bronx.

I’d just finished doing my presentation to that very polite audience. Great kids. The very fact that they were here spending a sunny Saturday morning in school spoke volumes about their motivation. I’d been introduced as an American Indian author.

And as I told a story and then talked a little about my two YA novels—Wolf Mark (Lee & Low, 2011) and Killer of Enemies (Lee & Low/Tu, 2013)—which had just been given to each of those young men and women, they’d listened attentively.

“So,” I said, “any questions?”

And that was when, in the second row, the young woman wearing a scarf had raised her hand and made that comment. “You don’t look like an Indian.” [read more]

Posted on Wednesday, April 23rd 2014

Reblogged from The Other Grimoire

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